The next man has already been up.

With the loss of starting left tackle Penei Sewell to injury, perhaps for the remainder of the regular season, redshirt junior Brady Aiello will be thrust back into the starting lineup on No. 12 Oregon’s offensive line.

The 6-foot-7, 310-pound redshirt junior made 10 starts at left tackle for an injured Tyrell Crosby in 2016 and three more starts at right tackle last season.

Calvin Throckmorton will replace Sewell at left tackle, and Aiello will move into the right tackle spot as the Ducks prepare to face No. 25 Washington State on Saturday at Martin Stadium (4:30 p.m., Fox).

“Being here for four years, I’ve kind of grown accustomed to being ready,” Aiello said after Tuesday’s practice. “Right now it’s kind of second nature. A couple seasons ago, I played the whole season. Last year, I had to be ready.

“It doesn’t matter what role it is, as long as it’s a role to help the team, I’m always ready.”

 

Oregon’s offensive line, considered the deepest and strongest unit on the team, overcame some attrition and a stout defense during the 30-27 overtime win over Washington.

In addition to losing Sewell to a high ankle sprain, starting right guard Dallas Warmack left the game with a stinger. He was replaced by sophomore Jacob Capra, who played a season-high 66 snaps against the rival Huskies.

Aiello and Capra helped open up the spacious hole CJ Verdell ran through for the winning score.

“Even on the final play of the game, those guys made two huge blocks and probably sprung CJ for the touchdown,” quarterback Justin Herbert said. “It was really fun to see, and I’m proud of those guys for sure.”

Coach Mario Cristobal, who still oversees the offensive line, obviously had a lot of faith in the reshuffled unit to deliver a signature victory.

Oregon finished with 177 yards rushing and 202 yards passing against Washington.

“It was an awesome play call, 6-yard line, inside zone, just typical Cristobal right there,” Aiello said. “The defense had no idea it was coming, and Cap and I just did a great job finishing the blocks.”

Sewell, currently ranked the No. 6 tackle in the nation, according to Pro Football Focus, is expected to miss about six weeks. The 6-6, 345-pound phenom started the first six games of the season and was the first Oregon true freshman to start on the offensive line in a season opener since 1997.

"It's tough for him,” Cristobal said of Sewell. “This is his passion, he loves his teammates. He has done a great job helping us establish a certain demeanor up front."

Throckmorton, a three-year starter, hasn’t allowed a sack in his last 1,797 snaps over 24 games. The 6-5, 318-pound redshirt junior has made 31 consecutive starts — 28 at right tackle and three at right guard.

“Calvin is really rare,” offensive coordinator Marcus Arroyo said. “To be able to play every position on the front is really impressive, and we’re fortunate to have him.”

During the portion of Tuesday’s practice open to the media, the first-team offensive line consisted of Throckmorton (left tackle), Shane Lemieux (left guard), Jake Hanson (center), Warmack (right guard) and Aiello (right tackle).

The young second-string unit included junior George Moore (left tackle), redshirt freshman Alex Forsyth (left guard), redshirt freshman Ryan Walk (center), Capra (right guard) and true freshman Steven Jones (right tackle).

True freshman Justin Johnson (shoulder) is out indefinitely.

“Fortunately we’ve got eight guys that rotate in and we’ve got complete trust in them,” Herbert said. “I know the guys behind (Sewell) will do a great job, and we’ll get those guys up to speed as soon as possible.”

Lemieux, another redshirt junior with 31 consecutive starts, was named to the Associated Press midseason all-American first team Tuesday. Oregon safety Ugo Amadi was named to the second team.

“Calvin is already up to speed and popping over to left tackle is really no difference whatsoever,” Lemieux said. “Brady is one of my best friends. That’s obviously a real tough situation (being a backup), but you can just tell how much character he has and how much he loves this team and this program, how much he still works. …

“I’m really proud of him.”